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Author Topic: Enioch's naval shenanigans - RTW as Japan - [Image Heavy!]  (Read 34783 times)

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Offline Enioch

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  • Alternative History Word Writer
Re: Enioch's naval shenanigans - RTW as Japan - [Image Heavy!]
That is, indeed, Mata Hari. History is still undecided on how GOOD a spy she was, but she was certainly the most famous one. Which, on hindsight, may have been the problem... :rolleyes:

As for the image dates, they were 1905 and 1904 respectively. So pre-OTL- Russo-Japanese War.
'Violence is the last refuge of the incompetent'  -Salvor Hardin, "Foundation"

So don't take a hammer to your computer. ;-)

 

Offline crizza

  • 210
Re: Enioch's naval shenanigans - RTW as Japan - [Image Heavy!]
So, you design the ships you want or can you use predesigned ships?

I'm failing to design sound concepts in HoI and RTW looks way more complicated...
Check out my blog:

http://geo.schulzbert.de/

 

Offline Enioch

  • 210
  • Alternative History Word Writer




Two events marked March of 1909: firstly, the further development of the oil-fired boiler design via the introduction of economisers and, seondly, the development of the first functional 14'' inch guns by the USA. The Japanese Admiralty were concerned by this, as their own gun foundries could only manufacture guns of up to 11 inches; however, intelligence reports indicated that the American 14'' rifles had atrocious gun handling and accuracy. There were proposals to approach the Americans in the interest of acquiring the licence for further experimentation, but they came to nothing, given the Navy's limited budget.



By April, the lessons gleaned from the Matsukazes' shakedown cruises were implemented in the design of a new, experimental 900-ton destroyer class: the Nokaze. These were ships that could reach an even higher top speed, of 33 knots. Only two ships were put into production for now: the Nokaze and the Hakaze.

In addition, the Admiralty ordered a revolutionary oil-fired light cruiser class, the Itsukushima.



These were ships meant not for raiding but for service in the waters of South-East Asia. They were heavily armed, with a 6-gun broadside of the superb Japanese 6-inchers and four underwater torpedo tubes; more significantly, they were designed to reach a staggering flank speed of 29 knots. Japan wanted to make sure she would not lose any of these ships to enemy battlecruisers and so she gave them speed to rival a destroyer. Their belt armour was also surprisingly tough for a light cruiser, at 2.5 inches, capable of defeating small-caliber guns.

All-in-all, the Itsukushimas would have made every other light cruiser in the world obsolete, overnight; especially the 'destroyer-killing' French designs. However, due to lack of funds, the laying down of the first ships of the class was delayed for several months.





Finally, it was the US who approached the Japanese, expressing their interest for IJN torpedo technology. The Admiralty graciously allowed the licencing of preheater designs to the US Navy, in exchange for a much-needed influx of cash for their budget.





New developments in armour and hull constructions came at the right time, before the laying down of the first Itsukushimas: the new technologies were implemented into their design, offering a moderate amount of weight savings.



And in August the docks in Kure and Yokosuka were expanded even further, for the inevitable time when Japan could afford a bigger and badder capital ship.



Thankfully, the steel industry lobbies proved themselves a valuable asset to the Navy in this period. Interestingly, for the first time, American industrialists expressed interest in establishing overseas foundries in Japan and Formosa. Under political pressure to improve the market, the Government released an extra yearly six million for the Navy budget.



However, the naval secretary stipulated that these funds were not for the Navy to play around with. The government was 'all too aware' of the role the submarines had played in the Franco-Japanese war, and they were expecting no less than 11 new submarines to be laid down immediately.



Especially since new diesel engines, fuelled by the Sumatran oil fields, would make submarines more effective than ever.



In December, the Italians arrived with a rather expensive gift: the design for a high-quality 4'' rifle, perfectly suited for use in the IJN destroyer fleet. The Navy jumped at the opportunity -



- and immediately laid down the 11 submarines the naval secretary was so eager for.



As a gesture of good will, Japan agreed to assist the Italians with a rebellion in their colony of Eritrea. Fuso and Izumi were dispatched with an Army complement; the rebellion, which had bogged down Italian troops for three months was dealt with in two weeks.



OK, NOW YOU'RE PUSHING YOUR LUCK, SPAGHETTIS.

So, as Japan entered this new decade, her Navy list included the following:



A Battle-line comprised of the two obsolescent Fusos and the modern battlecruiser Tsukuba, with Ikoma less than a year away from completion.



Three old Asama-class heavy cruisers, still very much competitive if slow ships.



The three Izumis, heavily refitted and modernised, although still coal-fired.



Three Unebis, rigged for long-range raider duty.



14 second-rate Asanagi and Asanagi-Kai destroyers, best suited for convoy and escort duties.



10 first-rate Matsukazes



And a healthy 17 Minesweepers for the 'Maru boys'.

She also had 11 subs in active service, with another 11 improved models being constructed.



The new decade started well for the Japanese, with an industrial boom like none seen before. It's not by chance that the American-Japanese foundries began their work in February; but new native plants were also set up in Sumatra, Nagasaki and Sasebo.



In April, the R & D team kicked down the door to the Admiralty with a spectacular new development: they felt they had cracked the problems of stability and weight distribution that prevented four centreline turrets to be mounted on a ship. They were still unwilling to risk a 'B' superfiring turret, but the Admiralty agreed that this could revolutionise Japanese ship design. More importantly, the scientists were confident that they were world leaders in this regard - Japan was opening her technology lead once more.



In May, with Ikoma less than 6 months from completion, the Navy finally felt confident in setting aside funds for the construction of the Itsukushimas The two ships were laid down in Sasebo and Tsingtaou.



This caused a major 'Navy Craze' in Japan. There were new things happening in the scene and national pride throughout the Alliance rose again. The Government was quick to capitalise on this by promoting the 'very succesful' Submarine program they had begun, eager to earn political capital with the population in the light of the first instituted elections, to be held in August.



The Prime Minister also suggested a repeat of the 1904 shooting competition, to drum up further support. The Navy enthusiastically agreed, eager to increase its prestige with the population.

This time, the competition was a truly grand affair, lasting throughout the entire month. The fleet toured the Alliance, with specific shooting tasks assigned for each region, and with the local population gathering around on the docks and in small ships to watch. There were festivals and open-air massive kitchens for the atendees; bands playing; flags and flowers decorating entire towns. A minute-by-minute recounting of the events was telegraphed throughout the Alliance, with crowds clustering around the telegraph offices and betting on the local favourites. There are no official data, obviously, but bookies would claim that more than six million (the equivalent of three month's worth of the Ikoma's construction costs, to put the figure into perspective) changed hands during the competition.

The competition, once more, came down to the wire. Little Yaeyama gave a very good showing, coming in third, only just overtaking veteran Izumi and starting a night-long celebration in the Marianas and the Bismarck Archipelago in honour of her crew. Tsukuba, the Pride of the Fleet came in second.

And Fuso, the old 'Lady of China', the 'Lucky Ship', a ship well into her twilight years, smashed her previous record with a jaw-dropping bullseye at 21,340 metres off the coast of Formosa, which crowned her the undisputed winner of the competition and drove the crowds into hysterics.








« Last Edit: June 18, 2018, 07:35:23 pm by Enioch »
'Violence is the last refuge of the incompetent'  -Salvor Hardin, "Foundation"

So don't take a hammer to your computer. ;-)

 

Offline Enioch

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Re: Enioch's naval shenanigans - RTW as Japan - [Image Heavy!]
So, you design the ships you want or can you use predesigned ships?

I'm failing to design sound concepts in HoI and RTW looks way more complicated...

Yes.

You can ask the computer to generate a valid 'type' design and use it (i.e. 'Give me a Heavy Cruiser') but AI designs can be retarded or not give you that one thing you want from your ship (i.e. that extra knot).

So, you can design your own ships.

You select a displacement (i.e. 'How big is the ship'?), which gives you a weight budget. Then you add turrets, select gun caliber and add the secondary batteries. Then you assign armor to the various ship sections (i.e. deck, belt, turrets). Then you set a design speed, a desired range and a focus on engine speed or reliability - the computer calculates the weight of the machinery and lets you know how much the ship will cost you and whether this design is viable for your displacement budget.

If not, you might want to reduce weight by e.g. removing armour, or aim for a lower design speed, or even increase your displacement (thus allowing more machinery and weight to be included). It's fiddly and you never will be satisfied with a midgame design, especially since technology moves so fast that the ship will be obsolete before it even leaves the yards, and you know it. So it's a delicate balance between 'Yeah, I'm gonna need a dreadnought pretty soon, so BUILD SOMETHING, ANYTHING  NOW' and 'Yeah, I'll wait for Superimposed B before laying down my new battlecruiser and hope the **** doesn't hit the fan before that'.
'Violence is the last refuge of the incompetent'  -Salvor Hardin, "Foundation"

So don't take a hammer to your computer. ;-)

 

Offline StarSlayer

  • 211
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    • Steam
Re: Enioch's naval shenanigans - RTW as Japan - [Image Heavy!]
Tensions ratcheting up with ze Germans? 

May we be seeing the ejection of a European Power from the Pacific in the near future?
“Think lightly of yourself and deeply of the world”

 

Offline Enioch

  • 210
  • Alternative History Word Writer
Re: Enioch's naval shenanigans - RTW as Japan - [Image Heavy!]
Indeed, that's the idea. The occupation of Java was a big mistake.

A few PSAs:

1. I've added a table of contents in the first post, for your kind gentlemen's ease of navigation.

2. I'm becoming rather invested in this thing and I'd love to invite Omakes and plot discussion. Feel free to participate with speculation, kantai-flavoured ficlets, 'bloopers', Slice-of-Life pieces for the ships / crews, political discussion or anything that you'd like to contribute. It would make the writer happy.
« Last Edit: December 06, 2016, 09:56:55 am by Enioch »
'Violence is the last refuge of the incompetent'  -Salvor Hardin, "Foundation"

So don't take a hammer to your computer. ;-)

 

Offline crizza

  • 210
Re: Enioch's naval shenanigans - RTW as Japan - [Image Heavy!]
Have you named fleets?
Just named my japanese fleets for HoI 4, starting with the Rengo Kantai, Dai-Ni Kantai and so on.
Check out my blog:

http://geo.schulzbert.de/

 

Offline Enioch

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Re: Enioch's naval shenanigans - RTW as Japan - [Image Heavy!]
The game does not allow you to form fleets - just assign ships to operational areas. That said, I have organised my ships to some degree and, fluff-wise, yes, here are the fleets:

Japan's Navy is currently (1910) divided into four 'fleets' (two major and two minor), which do not correspond to a group of ships but to operational areas. A fleet is comprised of task groups. Ships may move between fleets as operational requirements demand, although effort is made to limit such mobility in the interests of facilitating administration. These fleets are:

- Major Fleets -

  • Rengō Kantai 聯合艦隊 (Combined Fleet): Operates in the home islands. Currently consists of Tsukuba, Asama (operating in different task forces) and two destroyer flotillas of Asanagis and Asanagi-Kais.
    • Includes the minor fleet Dai-Ichi Tokumu Kantai 第一特務艦隊 (First Special Task Fleet), which consists of the three Unebis operating semi-independantly as raiders and patrollers.

  • Shina Hōmen Kantai 支那方面艦隊 (China Area Fleet): Operates in the South China Sea. Consists of two task forces, with Fuso and Hatsuse as flagships, based in Tsingtaou and Sumatra, respectively. Fuso is escorted by Izumo and Hatsuse is escorted by Izumi and Naniwa. Both Task forces have a mixed screen of Asanagis and Matsukazes, with the Nokazes under construction being meant for Fuso's task force.

- Independent Minor Fleets -

  • Nantō Hōmen Kantai 南東方面艦隊 (Southeast Area Fleet): Operates in the Marianas and the Bismarck Archipelago. Consists of the heavy cruiser Yakumo and the light cruiser Takachiho and is, reinforced, when necessary, by the Dai-Ichi Tokumu Kantai ships (especially Yaeyama).

The Marus and Submarines comprise the Keibi Kantai 警備艦隊 (Guard Fleet) and the Dai-Ni Tokumu Kantai 第二特務艦隊 (2nd Special Task Fleet) respectively. These 'Fleets' only exist for logistics purposes on paper; the ships are attached to the other fleets as the situation demands or operate independently in coast guard / submarine raiding duties.
'Violence is the last refuge of the incompetent'  -Salvor Hardin, "Foundation"

So don't take a hammer to your computer. ;-)

 

Offline Spoon

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Re: Enioch's naval shenanigans - RTW as Japan - [Image Heavy!]
How does gun quality work?
Urutorahappī!!

[02:42] <@Axem> spoon somethings wrong
[02:42] <@Axem> critically wrong
[02:42] <@Axem> im happy with these missions now
[02:44] <@Axem> well
[02:44] <@Axem> with 2 of them

 

Offline Enioch

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Re: Enioch's naval shenanigans - RTW as Japan - [Image Heavy!]
Quality affects all gun characteristics, including base gun range, penetration and rate of fire.

Quality can range from -2 (truly abysmal - why did you think this was a good idea?) to +1 (truly exceptional) and can be upgraded through gun research (i.e. gun research can develop bigger calibers, or upgrade what you already have).

As a rule of thumb, a -1 quality gun performs as bad as a 0 quality gun of a lower caliber; and a +1 gun performs as well as a 0 quality gun of a higher caliber. This means, for instance, that the -1 12'' guns on the Fuso have comparable performance to the 0 11'' guns of the Tsukuba.

As a real-world example: the 16'' guns of the Nagatos would have been quite respectable 0-quality rifles; however, the 16-inchers of the Iowas were, unquestionably +1 quality guns.
« Last Edit: December 06, 2016, 12:51:50 pm by Enioch »
'Violence is the last refuge of the incompetent'  -Salvor Hardin, "Foundation"

So don't take a hammer to your computer. ;-)

 

Offline Enioch

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Sie kommt - sie kommt; mit Nebel und Feuer!




In July, the British approached the Admiralty, proposing to sell them designs for three-gun turrets. It was clear that this was because of the rising tensions: Great Britain did not wish for a European war against the Germans, but was not averse to strengthening the Japanese, in the hopes of a crippling blow being struck against the Germans in the Far East. The British designs were primitive - but they would serve as the basis for more refined Japanese designs in the future and the Admiralty accepted the proposal.



As Summer progressed, training cruises involving Tsukuba and the Unebis led to the conclusion that battlecruisers could, surprisingly, serve as excellent scouting elements as well. Their speed, range and their exceptional optics would make them great additions to light cruiser squadrons and would offer that extra 'punch' that could critically tip the balance in a cruiser vs cruiser engagement.



More significantly, the gun foundries of Japan, spurred on by the recent developments in American gun manufacture, came up with a working design of a 12'' rifle that had considerably better performance than the old British 12'' models of the Fusos.





At the end of August, the first Democratic Elections were held among the people of the Alliance. The new Government head, Yamamoto Gonbee, a retired Vice Admiral, was well known for his democratic views and would, later in his political career, be a firm supporter of universal male suffrage; he was also a proponent of firm military action and a militant defender of the interests of the Alliance and its people in Eastern Asia.



One of his Government's first actions was to reject a military alliance with Russia. He was familiar with the earlier attempt of the Italians to plumb the secrets of Japanese military technology under the guise of a treaty and he would not allow the Tsarists to close the military technology gap. Tensions, as expected, rose, but not to any noticeable degree.



In September, the work of the engineers on damage control systems paid off. Better pumps, powered by isolated diesel generators were installed in all ships, thereby limiting the chance that a ship would be lost to flooding, like the unlucky Akikaze.



War nearly snuck up to Japan unexpectedly in October, when Asama, operating as a screen for Tsukuba during maneuvers, spotted a small boat closing the distance with the fleet at relatively high speed. Hails were ignored; a warning shot was fired; the ship gave no response. Fearing a suicide attack against Tsukuba, Asama fired for effect and sunk the ship on her second salvo.

It turns out that the ship was a German trawler, operating off Kiautschou bay. Its actions were never explained and no survivors were recovered, despite the best efforts of the Japanese destroyers. Germany, of course, raised merry hell in the diplomatic scene, but faced nothing but iron contempt from the Japanese (and Great Britain, and France, who were happy to join in their rival's embarrassment). The ship had been operating in restricted waters; had not responded to hails; and the Japanese had taken all necessary steps before opening fire. Germany backed down, but resentment raged under the surface.





*Ahem*. Nothing important happened in November.



And in December, new mines were introduced. The 'Maru boys' would have their hands full in the near future, sweeping and re-laying several minefields in home waters.

Also...



Ikoma was launched, on the 23rd of December 1910. The Mountain left the slipway with a grace that belied its gargantuan weight, under the watchful eyes of the Emperor, the Government and a multitude of onlookers. And there was much celebration; and the streets of Kure were filled with people. But, throughout the feasting and the dancing and the merrymaking, there was a note of apprehension. Unlike Tsukuba, the 'People's ship', Ikoma looked almost - vicious. Malicious. Even her crew would speak of their ship in hushed, frightened tones, claiming that she smelled of blood and that she was haunted or cursed. And of how she refused to reach her top speed, despite their engineers' best attempts, because everybody knew that the dock foreman had died in an accident when the engines were installed and unless somebody exorcised the ship, she'd always be...well, evil

Of course, that did not prevent them from respecting or even liking the ship. A capricious, vicious ***** the Ikoma may have been; but she was their ***** and that would quickly prove to be a very good thing indeed.



-END PART 2-
« Last Edit: June 18, 2018, 07:35:58 pm by Enioch »
'Violence is the last refuge of the incompetent'  -Salvor Hardin, "Foundation"

So don't take a hammer to your computer. ;-)

 
Re: Enioch's naval shenanigans - RTW as Japan - [Image Heavy!]
Thematically appropriate HOI3 music!

 

Offline Lorric

  • 212
Re: Enioch's naval shenanigans - RTW as Japan - [Image Heavy!]
Universal male suffrage. A much needed step forward for men towards real equality in a female dominated World. ;)

 

Offline Enioch

  • 210
  • Alternative History Word Writer
Re: Enioch's naval shenanigans - RTW as Japan - [Image Heavy!]
'Violence is the last refuge of the incompetent'  -Salvor Hardin, "Foundation"

So don't take a hammer to your computer. ;-)

 

Offline Spoon

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  • ヾ(´︶`♡)ノ
Re: Enioch's naval shenanigans - RTW as Japan - [Image Heavy!]
 :lol:


Quality affects all gun characteristics, including base gun range, penetration and rate of fire.

Quality can range from -2 (truly abysmal - why did you think this was a good idea?) to +1 (truly exceptional) and can be upgraded through gun research (i.e. gun research can develop bigger calibers, or upgrade what you already have).

As a rule of thumb, a -1 quality gun performs as bad as a 0 quality gun of a lower caliber; and a +1 gun performs as well as a 0 quality gun of a higher caliber. This means, for instance, that the -1 12'' guns on the Fuso have comparable performance to the 0 11'' guns of the Tsukuba.

As a real-world example: the 16'' guns of the Nagatos would have been quite respectable 0-quality rifles; however, the 16-inchers of the Iowas were, unquestionably +1 quality guns.
  :yes: Seems like a mechanic that makes sense
Urutorahappī!!

[02:42] <@Axem> spoon somethings wrong
[02:42] <@Axem> critically wrong
[02:42] <@Axem> im happy with these missions now
[02:44] <@Axem> well
[02:44] <@Axem> with 2 of them

 

Offline Enioch

  • 210
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Sie kommt - sie kommt; mit Sturm und Gewitter!
- PART 3 -
Ikoma's War


Pictured: HIJMS Ikoma cruising off Kure - Early 1911

The commissioning of Ikoma freed up a substantial part of the Admiralty's monthly budget. This money was immediately put to good use, given the rising tensions and the threat of imminent war.





A third Itsukushima-class cruiser, Matsushima was laid down in Kure, with a planned completion time of just under two years.



The majority of the funds, however, were dedicated to a strict training regimen for the entirety of the fleet but, primarily, Ikoma. Japan was placing a lot of her eggs in one, very expensive basket and it was imperative that Ikoma perform well.



By February, the 11 submarines were also complete and joined the Silent Service. The funds that were freed up were immediately assigned to the construction of two more Nokaze-class destroyers: Minekaze and Hakaze.





And in March, the US surprised Japan by offering the licence to their mechanical analog fire-control computer. Easily integrated into the central-firing control system of the Japanese ships, this computing table would be further refined in the upcoming years.



In May, the R & D engineers approached the Admiralty with a 'how is it possible that nobody has never thought of this before?" concept. Early DDs could not support the necessary weight on their centreline, but the new Nokazes were more than capable of mounting a centreline double torpedo launcher.





And with the new, contra-rotating propeller system the engineers presented, said torpedoes would run straight and true for more than three thousand yards. Suffice it to say that the Admirals found themselves very interested.



And when the French light cruiser Sfax docked in Yokosuka in the context of diplomatic discussions regarding the quickly developing tensions between France and Germany near Cochin China, the Admirals may have been slightly dismissive of the cruiser's capabilities, which was understandable, given how massively the French vessel was outclassed by the Itsukushimas under construction. The French did not particularly appreciate it.



In July, tensions skyrocketed when German guerillas incited a revolution near Kwang-Chou-Wan, a French colony near Hong Kong. Amassing a significant army of Chinese rebels, they marched against the city. Unfortunately for them, a Japanese and Sumatran delegation was present in the city. Operating under the principle that forgiveness is easier to obtain than permission, the Prime Minister ordered a naval strike against their positions.

Fuso was nearby. Enough said.

Of course, the French were not particularly enthused by the fact that the Japanese had, effectively, bombarded their holdings. Tensions rose between the two countries; but it was acknowledged that the crisis had been, primarily, instigated by Germany. The Prussian meddling in the Far East was beginning to grate on a lot of people's nerves, including those of the British: Hong Kong, after all, had been quite near the troubled area and might have easily been the target of the rebels...



Their time with the American computer also allowed the Japanese engineers to establish the simple principle of 'garbage in - garbage out'. An effort was made to improve the quality of the input, and so, stereoscopic rangefinders were introduced.



In August, the Prime Minister made a token effort to ease the tensions in the South China Sea. It truly was token and fooled nobody. War was not only inevitable, but also desired by both sides.



In September, much too late to be of any use to the Japanese for the near future, the scientists came up with a revolutionary concept: that of applying the principles of heavy cruiser sloped deck armor to light cruisers. Earlier shipbuilding techniques would have resulted in a structurally unsound vessel, but their experience with light forces and the developments in lighter and stronger materials had made this a possibility. Japan would never build a protected cruiser again.



On the same month, Vice Admiral Fujiwara (about to be promoted to Fleet Admiral) visited the Prime Minister who, we must remind the reader, was himself a retired Admiral. The two men discussed the situation and Fujiwara appeared very optimistic - if Japan could somehow buy just a little more time.

"Buy me five more months," he is said to have asked the Prime Minister, "and I shall win Nippon such glory as she has never seen before."



It seemed that Fujiwara would not get his wish. Two days after his meeting with the Prime Minister, they received news from Military Intelligence that the Germans were mobilising the majority of their capital ships (six predread battleships, their newly completed battlecruiser Von der Tann and that they had also started construction of a dreadnought.

When officially queried, they declared that this mobilisation was for training purposes only and that ships would return to reserve status after the maneuvers were complete. Neither Fujiwara nor Yamamoto were fooled.





A last ditch effort to prevent war was made by Great Britain, who was concerned about her own interests in Southeast Asia. Japan agreed to host an international conference in Tokyo, in which absolutely no effort was made to improve relations with Germany. Instead, Japanese diplomats focused their efforts on the British and American delegates and, in no uncertain terms, made it clear that, as long as no assistance was provided to Germany (something that neither the British or the Americans were keen to do, anyway) the British and American holdings in the South China Sea would be held as sacrosanct for the Alliance fleet. The conference ended with Germany notably short on friends.

This situation could not last any longer. It, amazingly, dragged on for three more months, thanks to the magnificent efforts of the Yamamoto administration.



In February 1912, however, Germany presented Japan with the unavoidable ultimatum, which was summarily rejected. Eleven years after their last conflict, the two nations were, again, at war.

« Last Edit: June 18, 2018, 07:36:25 pm by Enioch »
'Violence is the last refuge of the incompetent'  -Salvor Hardin, "Foundation"

So don't take a hammer to your computer. ;-)

 

Offline StarSlayer

  • 211
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    • Steam
Re: Enioch's naval shenanigans - RTW as Japan - [Image Heavy!]
That ship is going to look bananas if she ever goes full pagoda. :pimp:
“Think lightly of yourself and deeply of the world”

 

Offline crizza

  • 210
Re: Enioch's naval shenanigans - RTW as Japan - [Image Heavy!]
Can you aim for developing a Nagato?
Check out my blog:

http://geo.schulzbert.de/

 

Offline Enioch

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Re: Enioch's naval shenanigans - RTW as Japan - [Image Heavy!]
That ship is going to look bananas if she ever goes full pagoda. :pimp:

Yes, she would look awesome, wouldn't she?  :drevil:

Can you aim for developing a Nagato?

Depends on what you mean. Theoretically, yes, it is more than possible. For this play through, however, I've reached the 40s and, while I have laid down a Nagato-class, it's considerably different than what you probably have in mind.
'Violence is the last refuge of the incompetent'  -Salvor Hardin, "Foundation"

So don't take a hammer to your computer. ;-)

 

Offline crizza

  • 210
Re: Enioch's naval shenanigans - RTW as Japan - [Image Heavy!]
Looking forward to it :D

So there is no time limit to the singleplayer, but CVs are not implented?
Check out my blog:

http://geo.schulzbert.de/