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Voting closed: April 25, 2019, 04:30:47 pm

Author Topic: Enioch's naval shenanigans - RTW as Germany - [Image Heavy!]  (Read 38583 times)

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Re: Enioch's naval shenanigans - RTW as Germany - [Image Heavy!]
I noticed the trails, and I have to say they're massively useful for following the action.

 

Offline Torchwood

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Re: Enioch's naval shenanigans - RTW as Germany - [Image Heavy!]
Thirded. Please keep the trails.

 

Offline StarSlayer

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Re: Enioch's naval shenanigans - RTW as Germany - [Image Heavy!]
That Pamyat Azova class though... 
“Think lightly of yourself and deeply of the world”

 

Offline Droid803

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Re: Enioch's naval shenanigans - RTW as Germany - [Image Heavy!]
I do like the trails.

Also lol that battleship with noguns
(´・ω・`)
=============================================================

 

Offline Enioch

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Re: Enioch's naval shenanigans - RTW as Germany - [Image Heavy!]
OK, so I think that everybody liked the trails. They will, therefore, stay.

I am currently lacking anything comparable to the massive Kantai fandom to draw funnies from. So things might be a bit more serious than the Japanese campaign. If there's anything that you think would fit the theme, poke me with it and I'll see what I can do.
'Violence is the last refuge of the incompetent'  -Salvor Hardin, "Foundation"

So don't take a hammer to your computer. ;-)

 

Offline Col. Fishguts

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Re: Enioch's naval shenanigans - RTW as Germany - [Image Heavy!]
As someone who doesn't play the game and is regularly confused on what he's looking at, yes the ship trails help a lot :)
"I don't think that people accept the fact that life doesn't make sense. I think it makes people terribly uncomfortable. It seems like religion and myth were invented against that, trying to make sense out of it." - D. Lynch

Visit The Babylon Project, now also with HTL flavour  ¦ GTB Rhea

 

Offline Scotty

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Re: Enioch's naval shenanigans - RTW as Germany - [Image Heavy!]
I think having a fantastic (literally speaking) and humorous Japanese playthrough naturally begs for a 100% serious no humor allowed German playthrough.

 

Offline Torchwood

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Re: Enioch's naval shenanigans - RTW as Germany - [Image Heavy!]
[leutnant]WAR IS A SERIOUS MATTER! **** YOU![/leutnant]

 
Re: Enioch's naval shenanigans - RTW as Germany - [Image Heavy!]
Mein Kaiser, our fleet's performance like that was like a punch from a weak left arm! It is unthinkable that the left arm of our fleet, our battleships, were not supported by a strong right arm of destroyer torpedo runs!

please make as much fun as possible out of Kaiser ****ing Wilheim.
AKA [`_`]
Inferno: It's the I in Inferno / It's the beam spam delight / Risin' up to a shock jump arrivaaaaaal
Between The Ashes: Look just a really cool and neat thing, OK?
Dimesional Eclipse: High speed anime girlies blowing **** up gets me excited
The Last Stand: A very episodic capship command mini-campaign
Breakthrough: A pretty standard but not really capship command mission

 

Offline Mika

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Re: Enioch's naval shenanigans - RTW as Germany - [Image Heavy!]
Once again the Gulf of Finland proves to be difficult for fleets exchanging fire!

Quote
The Germans form line of battle. The Russians form...a blob of battle?

That's actually surprisingly accurate historically.

Since its mid May, the Gulf is not frozen anymore. Would be interesting to see a winter marine engagement - with pack ice...

Makes me wonder how well does the game simulate the actual depth of the Gulf. From what I've understood, straying from the mapped lines carries a significant risk of running aground anywhere near the mainland of Finland.

Also, this


Let those slaughterships rule the seas!
Relaxed movement is always more effective than forced movement.

 

Offline Enioch

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Re: Enioch's naval shenanigans - RTW as Germany - [Image Heavy!]
Mein Kaiser, our fleet's performance like that was like a punch from a weak left arm! It is unthinkable that the left arm of our fleet, our battleships, were not supported by a strong right arm of destroyer torpedo runs!

You try to convince KFW that destroyers are a necessary part of a battle-line. Galster has almost given up trying.

Would be interesting to see a winter marine engagement - with pack ice...

Not directly simulated - although winter engagements have a higher chance of limiting ship speed because of weather.

Quote
Makes me wonder how well does the game simulate the actual depth of the Gulf. From what I've understood, straying from the mapped lines carries a significant risk of running aground anywhere near the mainland of Finland.

It doesn't, I'm afraid. Those areas of the Gulf that are too shallow are marked as 'swampland' / coastal shallows and ships will flat out refuse to enter them (they'll treat them as minefields).
« Last Edit: March 02, 2017, 08:13:34 pm by Enioch »
'Violence is the last refuge of the incompetent'  -Salvor Hardin, "Foundation"

So don't take a hammer to your computer. ;-)

 

Offline Enioch

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"After the Finlandschlacht, His Majesty was very angry with the performance of the Kaiserliche Marine. We had promised His Majesty a quick, decisive victory and had failed to deliver it. This was partly because of the incomplete training of our crews and, for that, the responsibility lay solely upon the Admiralität. But a significant part in the inconclusive battle was also played by the weather, which had prevented us from properly acquiring targets, even at extremely close ranges.

"More significantly, it became evident that positioning our ships in such a way as to maximise the number of ships firing on a single target was not a viable tactic. I can confirm that, during the battle, it was impossible to distinguish the splashes of Hertha's shells from those of Victoria Louise, or even the light cruisers! We had to instruct our officers to adopt a 'duelling' approach. Each ship's commanding officer was instructed to select targets that were currently unengaged above all others.

"But His Majesty harangued and criticised the Admiralität most severely for what he perceived to be our failings; and insisted that the Fleet pursue a more agggressive stance. In all frankness, this was the Admiralität's opinion also. Thankfully, His Excellency, the Herzog championed our cause to a considerable degree."

-Vizeadm. Galster K (post mort.) 1956, The Naval Question: Collected Papers and Letters, edited by Dr. Ernst Jablonka, Universitätsverlag Heidelberg.




No, Wilhelm wasn't pleased at all; but both von Bülow and von Mecklenburg laboured separately to support the Admiralität. Von Mecklenburg, in particular, invited the Admirals once more to his Berlin residence and requested that they point out what they thought the main problems with the German tactics so far had been. By this point, both von Tirpitz and Galster perceived the Herzog as a political ally; and were eager to discuss their future plans. Von Mecklenburg had firmly established himself as a supporter of the Kaiserliche Marine - even more so, when, in a callback to his Colonial service, he funded the dredging up of Tanga's military harbour, with the goal of converting it into a major coaling station for the colonial fleet.



With Mecklenburg only six months away from completion, the Admiralität played a game of cat-and-mouse with the Russian Fleet, buying time.



In early June, the Russian cruiser Nadezdha managed to sneak into German territorial waters and sank the freighter Rheingold.

This was the straw that broke the camel's back. With the German and Russian armies bogged down in tentative jabs and forays, Wilhelm ordered that the Flotte mobilize in full and "teach those Gotverdammte Russians their place."



Tirpitz was hesitant about commiting the battlefleet; but Galster employed his cruiser forces to great effect. On the 15th of June, Hertha and Freya engaged three Russian light cruisers in the Baltic Sea.



The Russians turned and ran under fire, denying battle; this cheered up Wilhelm to some extent.



It also emboldened Galster. For a followup, he led Hertha and Victoria Louise, accompanied by Frauenlob and three Zerstörer to Saaremaa.



There, he bombarded Russian coastal fortifications and sank four merchant vessels, avenging the Rheingold with added interest. Wilhelm, mollified, acknowledged the value of lighter forces for the first time; and allowed von Meclenburg to award Galster with the Grand Commander's Cross of the Order of the Griffon for his service, on behalf of Mecklenburg-Schwerin.



Tirpitz could not allow Galster to take all the glory. On the 17th of July, he sent out the entirety of his battlefield on a daring raid on Russian shipping, near Bornholm.



This time, the Russians responded.



The time is a quarter past noon, just to the east of Bornholm. The entirety of the German battleline is present, escorted by Galster's cruisers.



The weather, unfortunately, is, once again, overcast; and it is raining lightly. Visibility is...less than ideal. A stiff breeze blows from the east.

The Frauenlob, Victoria Louise and Freya are spread out in front of the fleet, as a scouting element. This time around, Galster is holding his flagship, Hertha, in reserve, near the battleships.



15:34: Contact! Victoria Louise spots an enemy capital ship emerging from a nearby fogbank.



Scratch that - two capitals. The Germans immediately re-arrange their fleet. The scouting elements fall back; the battleships maneuver to form line of battle. Wettin fires the first shot!



Ten minutes later, the secondaries of Wettin score first blood. This time around, the firing discipline of the Germans is much improved; each of the German battleships is engaging a different enemy capital.



The two battle-lines thunder at each other at under 5,000 yards. Both fleets are holding formation for now; but the German heavy cruisers are almost ready to lend their own fire to the line.



16:22. Wettin peppers one of the Pavels with secondary fire; she receives a hit in return, but her armor holds strong. Hertha, on the other hand, is hit by incendiary ammunition; her superstructure bursts in flames.



Galster curses bitterly and signals the Victoria Louise to assume command of the cruiser forces; Hertha pulls out of the battleline and cuts her speed, to allow damcon crews to get to work fighting the flames. Wettin keeps up the withering barrage of secondary fire on the Pavel.



16:44. The fire on Hertha is extinguished and Galster orders flank speed and rushes to rejoin the line. Further to the north, Braunschweig scores a main battery hit on the Petr Veliki; and Zähringen strikes the second Pavel.



Büchsel will not be denied this time around. The battleships serpentine in parallel with the Russian fleet; presenting alternating good and bad targets. This confuses the Russian gunners.



Meanwhile, during his mad rush to rejoin the battle-line, Galster runs across a Russian torpedoboat, that charges in for an attack. The entirety of Hertha's starboard secondary and tertiary battery erupts in fire and thunder. The Gremyashchy-class destroyer is blown out of the water and Hertha plows on, undaunted and unslowed.



Wettin, Braunschweig and Schwaben are closely engaging the Russian fleet; Zähringen has fallen behind, for unknown reasons. Büchsel curses bitterly, for he is now outnumbered. Even worse, Zähringen is firing at the Pamyat Azova and messing up Wettin's targeting.



The pursuit continues. Once again, the Schwaben-class' high speed helps the Germans dictate the battle.



18:40. Büchsel notes that the Petr Veliki is losing speed. He sees an opportunity and hoists the 'flotilla attack' signal. The three Zerstörer V3, V4 and V6 swing to the attack. Unfortunately, V6 is immediately struck by one of the Pietr Veliki's secondaries. Her single torpedo explodes on her mount. The ship shudders; but her machinery is still operational and she continues her mad charge, as bait if nothing else.



The three destroyers cross the Schwaben's wake and charge down the Pietr. Schwaben keeps up her own fire and scores another main battery hit and a secondary hit on the Russian's superstructure.



The Pietr maneuvers wildly to avoid the German ships but, at 500 yards, V4 launches her single torpedo. The destroyer flotilla then turns away, seeking safety behind Schwaben's armor.



The torpedo explosion blows a fountain of water sky-high. The Pietr shudders; her guns fall silent and she slows down even further. The German fleet erupts in cheers.



Galster maneuvers Hertha next to the hulk and opens up with main and secondary guns; twenty minutes later, the Pietr slips under the waves.



Büchsel, from on board the Braunschweig orders Schwaben and the destroyers to reform with the fleet; but Schwaben's captain, Kapitän zur Zee Nikolaus Bernuth, charges in, to keep the enemy spotted in the gloom. He puts her in a wild serpentine, to avoid incoming fire; and has her secondaries fire star-shells over the enemy ships. The entire fleet converges on her position.



Schwaben then uses her speed to cut in front of one of the Pavels. Zähringen and Hertha are not far behind.



The entire fleet swings past the Russian battleship. Hertha and Zähringen score hits with their main armament; and the cruisers completely obliterate her DD escort.



Then, the destroyers move in. V3 launches a torp at close range and scores a hit.



She's still fighting; and she has her own torpedo launchers. The Germans know they've hurt her; they are hesitant to take any risks. Büchsel orders his ships to open the range.



21:16. The Pavel increases her speed and tries to escape towards the east. The Germans pursue.



It doesn't take long for them to corner her again. She is now completely alone; the rest of the Russian fleet having retreated in the evening gloom.





22:19. Disaster strikes. The Pavel launches a torpedo that strikes the Freya amidships. Her keel snaps. She lists, flips over and sinks in under a minute.

The Germans are horrified; Galster more than anyone. In a single fell swoop, he has lost a third of his heavy cruiser fleet; and almost eight hundred sailors and officers.



But Büchsel grasps the opportunity. Knowing that the Pavel has launched her fish, he closes in with his battleships for the kill. Schwaben scores two main battery hits; and the Pavel follows the Freya to the bottom of the sea.

The fleet turns to return to port-



-and then, out of the night, a light cruiser appears on Zähringen's starboard side. The German battlewagon turns, desperately-



-but to no avail. She eats a torpedo and her superstructure is raked by multiple high-explosive shells before she can bring her guns to bear.



Thankfully, her damcon crews are on-point and her captain orders an emergency stop to avoid stressing the bulkheads. The Diana turns to bring her other launcher to bear-



-and is promptly blown out of the water by Zähringen's secondaries and Victoria Louise's 11-inchers.



It takes the crew of the Zähringen less than 10 minutes to stop the flooding. She has suffered considerable damage, but she's still afloat and seaworthy; she can even almost do cruise speed.

At this point, all commanders agree that they cannot expect any better results. They make best steam back to Danzig; the fleet reaches harbor by 6:00 am on the 18th of July.


The stricken Zähringen after the Bornholmschlacht



A bloody victory, but a glorious one, nonetheless! Tirpitz strutted like a rooster.









The Russian losses. Two battleships, including the Retvizan, one of their most modern battlewagons; the light cruiser Avrora and three destroyers.



The Germans only lost the Freya. A grievous loss, true; but a bittersweet one, given the toll they had exacted upon their enemies.



And, this time, the Germans could not complain about their gunnery. The Zähringen and Schwaben performed spectacularly, with more than 700 shells fired between them and almost 40 hits scored.
 


A more precise map of the ship movements, (for the naval historians - many thanks to the Admiralitätsarchiv for their kind permission to reproduce this)! Note the two 'knots' near the centre of the map - that's where the two Russian battleships sank.



The Battle of Bornholm! A glorious new beginning for the Kaiserliche Marine!



« Last Edit: May 31, 2018, 10:27:46 am by Enioch »
'Violence is the last refuge of the incompetent'  -Salvor Hardin, "Foundation"

So don't take a hammer to your computer. ;-)

 

Offline Torchwood

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Re: Enioch's naval shenanigans - RTW as Germany - [Image Heavy!]
A glorious day for the Kaiserliche Marine!

Since I know next to nothing about this game, all I can do is help out with language.
Mika, you made a nice meme but the proper grammar is "Es schlachtet Schiffe".

Diese verdammten Russen will regret the day they picked a fight with the Reich. Gott mit uns!

 

Offline StarSlayer

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Re: Enioch's naval shenanigans - RTW as Germany - [Image Heavy!]
A glorious sortie for the High Seas Fleet. :yes:

I assume once ze R&D discover the advanced technology of "paint ball rounds" they can effectively focus fire again? :P
“Think lightly of yourself and deeply of the world”

 

Offline Enioch

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Re: Enioch's naval shenanigans - RTW as Germany - [Image Heavy!]
A glorious sortie for the High Seas Fleet. :yes:

I assume once ze R&D discover the advanced technology of "paint ball rounds" they can effectively focus fire again? :P

Exactly
'Violence is the last refuge of the incompetent'  -Salvor Hardin, "Foundation"

So don't take a hammer to your computer. ;-)

 

Offline Mika

  • 28
Re: Enioch's naval shenanigans - RTW as Germany - [Image Heavy!]
Quote
It doesn't, I'm afraid. Those areas of the Gulf that are too shallow are marked as 'swampland' / coastal shallows and ships will flat out refuse to enter them (they'll treat them as minefields).

Dang it, no chance of something like this occurring then.
 
(The picture is U-363 that run aground in Swedish territorial waters in 1981. Navigational equipment failure was given as a reason). I imagine the region near the City of Turku being particularly prone for this. Finland has the greatest number of islands in the world (Archipelago of Finland), but nobody says anything about the size of those islands  ;7

Gulf of Finland and the Baltic Sea have historically been areas where there have been lesser known large marine confrontations, some of them ending up as mehs (like battle of Hogland), while some of them rather lopsided like the the battle of Gangut, and the battle of Juminda. EDIT: In Juminda, The Soviet fleet was forced to seek shelter at harbor near Tallinn, and the risk of getting captured grew all the time, so the decision was made to attempt a breakthrough. This breakthrough happened to require steaming through a Finnish-German mine field. Estimated 12 000 people died in this alone, a significant number of them being unfortunately civilians.
« Last Edit: March 03, 2017, 05:19:58 pm by Mika »
Relaxed movement is always more effective than forced movement.

 

Offline Enioch

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"The loss of the Freya was a great blow for our cruiser fleet, but there was no denying that Bornholm had been a spectacular victory for the Vaterland. Upon receiving the news that half of the Russian battlefleet had been sunk, His Majesty's spirits soared. He became particularly expressive and diffuse in his praise; and he would often refer to the fleet as 'meine Helden aufs Meer'.

"More importantly, it became possible for me to better promote the importance of the light forces in a battle-line. Where the cruiser raids of the previous months had shown His Majesty the utility and wide range of options that a strong cruiser fleet provides, Bornholm demonstrated the importance of our Zerstörer. Both of the lost enemy battleships had been softened up by our own battle-line; but it was the torpedoes of our destroyer flotilla that ultimately sent them to the bottom - and Freya had been lost to a torpedo attack.

"Upon our debriefing, Herr von Tirpitz and myself decided that our future doctrine had to take into account how these small craft could decisively affect the outcome of a battle. However, unsurprisingly, we disagreed considerably on what course we should pursue..."

-Vizeadm. Galster K (post mort.) 1956, The Naval Question: Collected Papers and Letters, edited by Dr. Ernst Jablonka, Universitätsverlag Heidelberg.




With a crushing numerical- and tonnage superiority over the Russians achieved, Büchsel establishes a distant blockade on the Russian ports. The German battlefleet is sufficient to keep the Russians bottled into the Baltic; and the Russian forces stationed in the Far East are so anemic that the German Gefions stationed there can, likewise, keep them contained. Tirpitz turns to the R & D department, for new, better options. Unfortunately, the engineers have little to show for their efforts.







And, meanwhile, the Russians take advantage of organisational problems encountered by the blockading forces to slip three raiders past the blockade. The Diana, Bayan and Nadezhda sink eight German freighters over the space of a month. Büchsel is at his wits' end and being heavily pressured by Tirpitz to do something: he can keep the Russian capitals and merchant traffic contained, but his battlewagons are too slow to intercept the fast Russian raiders.



Under his prompting, Galster and von Holtzendorff meet and draw up a battle plan; they dispatch the German Gazelles as fast interceptors. And their efforts are rewarded on the 19th of August, when the Frauenlob detects and engages the Diana, in the open sea near Skagerrak.



Diana has half an inch more of belt armor, but her guns are on shielded deck mounts instead of armored turrets, she is three knots slower and eleven hundred tons lighter than the Frauenlob.



The outcome of the battle was never in question. The German rakes her decks with high-explosive, silences her broadside and punishes her with close-range gunnery, until the Russian ship is a smoking wreck.



The Frauenlob's log recorded 56 hits scored, to only six received. The intensive gunnery training ofthe German crews was paying off dividents.



Von Holtzendorff received much praise for sinking the Russian raider - the loss of the ship limited the options of the Russians considerably.



At the end of the month, the Kaiser convened a war council. The land war was proceeding as well as could be expected, with the German army scoring considerable successes in the Baltic front; but Wilhelm was primarily concerned about the successes of his navy. He declared his complete satisfaction with how his forces had conducted the war so far (although he noted that they should have been much more aggressive during the early war months, given the Bornholm success), but expressed some concern regarding their future plans.

"The Russians are hiding in their harbors," he declared, "and you cannot draw them out. But nor can you keep them in, given that they're sinking our ships. What then shall you do, gentlemen?"

The Admiralität had been preparing for such a question. Von Mecklenburg had, once again, brought Tirpitz and Galster together and had hammered out a compromise. Tirpitz presented the Staff's new doctrine:

First, the battle-fleet would tighten the blockade of the Russian ports, and wait for the commissioning of the Mecklenburg before offering battle to the Russians. That would guarantee 2.5-to-1 odds in capital hulls. And if the Russians refused battle, the Germans would bring it to them: minesweepers would push into the Baltic and clear the enemy minefields, allowing the German battle-line to bombard coastal targets and ports.

"But what of the enemy raiders?" demanded the Kaiser. "How do you propose to stop them?"

This, explained Tirpitz, was the second part of the plan. He admitted (with a sour face) that Konteradmiral Galster's cruiser forces had proven themselves the only ships capable of tracking down and engaging the enemy forces. Unfortunately, the budget could not support the construction of new cruisers - and the war would be over by the time they left the slipways anyway.

The mood in the room fell immediately. "It was amazing to see," Galster writes,"His Majesty, always a defendder of the battleship, scowling at the news that we would not be building new cruisers." Thankfully, the Admiralität had a ready answer.

First, Tirpitz explained, the colonial bases would be further dredged up and funds set aside for the construction of coaling stations in Africa and the Pacific. The total cost of this massive upgrading of colonial infrastructure would cost less than half a cruiser and the works would be completed within a year. This would allow the German cruisers to operate in a much wider theater of operations and give them world-wide reach.

"D__n me if that isn't von Mecklenburg speaking!" the Kaiser exclaimed by the end of the proposal. "I agree, gentlemen, proceed!"



Tirpitz was not finished, however. He also submitted for the Kaiser's perusal the blueprints for a new iteration on the older Zerstörer designs: a ship of 600 tons, with improved speed and torpedo armament. The Großadmiral was uncharacteristically chipper as he presented the engineers work - and the Kaiser noticed.

"Well then, von Tirpitz," he chuckled, "back to designing torpedoboats, I see? Very well, I suppose these toy boats of yours have proven their worth. But not a single Mark is to be taken from the battleship budget, do you understand?"







His good mood would, unfortunately, not last long. Throughout September the reports came in: of Russian raiders running the blockade and sinking German freighters in the North Sea and the Atlantic. The losses were not heavy, but they grated and the Admiralität had long since realised that an annoyed Kaiser was not someone easy to work with.



Some entertainment was had when Military Intelligence "acquired" the plans of the British Bedford-class battleship. What were the Brits thinking?







But the Russian raiding campaign continued well into October.





This time around, however, the cruiser fleet passed their test with flying colors. Korvettenkapitän Henckel von Donnersmack had drawn up a detailed map of Russian raider sightings and traced their preferred sea routes. He then led his own small Gefion-class cruiser, the Nymphe on an independent intercept mission south of Ireland. He there spotted and engaged the Pamyat Merkuriya, eventually sinking the smaller Russian ship.





His victory was received with great enthusiasm in Berlin; and the Kaiser's spirits rose significantly with the commissioning of the final Schwaben-class battleship, the Mecklenburg. The commissioning was a grand affair, especially given the Herzog's recent rise in the Berlin political scene; his wife, the Prinzessin Elisabeth Sybille von Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach (who was also an increasingly well-known philanthropist) was called to organise the post-commissioning ball - which was a resounding success in Berliner high society.



And then, some good news from R & D! Improved safety valves were almost ready to be employed in warship boilers.









The Russian raiders scored more successes in November, but both Tirpitz and Büchsel were grimly satisfied. Two of the Russian raiders were confirmed to have been heavy cruisers, decidedly unsuited for raiding work. If the Russians were deploying those, that meant that they were running out of dedicated raiders - and exposing their capital ships to the danger of running the blockade.

It was only a matter of time before-



-that.



« Last Edit: May 31, 2018, 10:27:16 am by Enioch »
'Violence is the last refuge of the incompetent'  -Salvor Hardin, "Foundation"

So don't take a hammer to your computer. ;-)

 
Re: Enioch's naval shenanigans - RTW as Germany - [Image Heavy!]
NO MISTER FISHER, NO
AKA [`_`]
Inferno: It's the I in Inferno / It's the beam spam delight / Risin' up to a shock jump arrivaaaaaal
Between The Ashes: Look just a really cool and neat thing, OK?
Dimesional Eclipse: High speed anime girlies blowing **** up gets me excited
The Last Stand: A very episodic capship command mini-campaign
Breakthrough: A pretty standard but not really capship command mission

 

Offline Enioch

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Re: Enioch's naval shenanigans - RTW as Germany - [Image Heavy!]
NO MISTER FISHER, NO

 :lol:

This is going to be a 'thing' now, won't it?

EDIT: Also, I just finished this game (i.e. played all the way to January 1950) in my bus ride back from London. There has never been a time where I resented this hard cutoff point more.
« Last Edit: March 04, 2017, 03:51:27 pm by Enioch »
'Violence is the last refuge of the incompetent'  -Salvor Hardin, "Foundation"

So don't take a hammer to your computer. ;-)

 

Offline Spoon

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Re: Enioch's naval shenanigans - RTW as Germany - [Image Heavy!]
Oh man, those single russian torpedo mounts, I was worried for the Zähringen for a moment

And now, time for round 3



He he he he 'cockburn'
Urutorahappī!!

[02:42] <@Axem> spoon somethings wrong
[02:42] <@Axem> critically wrong
[02:42] <@Axem> im happy with these missions now
[02:44] <@Axem> well
[02:44] <@Axem> with 2 of them