Author Topic: Where is/was the Sol node in our solar system?  (Read 3202 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline ToecrusherHammerjaw

  • 27
  • Trayus no more.
Re: Where is/was the Sol node in our solar system?
There is a good reason however, that the original node would have been at Earth. It is discussed in a different thread, but the gist is that subspace nodes require a source of nearby gravity, most likely at the La Grange point around a planet.

If that's the case, what the hell is in the Alpha Centauri system generating incredible gravity?  There are three jump nodes there in close proximity.  (See FS1 mission Exodus, I think).

 

Offline Eishtmo

  • The one and only
  • 29
  • The One and Only
    • http://www.angelfire.com/games2/fsarchive/index.html
Re: Where is/was the Sol node in our solar system?
If that's the case, what the hell is in the Alpha Centauri system generating incredible gravity?  There are three jump nodes there in close proximity.  (See FS1 mission Exodus, I think).

Aside from that mission being an odd ball one in many, many respects, Alpha Centauri has at least three stars, so there might be your answer.
Warpstorm  Bringing Disorder to Chaos, And Eventually We'll Get It Right.

---------

I know there is a method, but all I see is madness.

 

Offline Solatar

  • 211
Re: Where is/was the Sol node in our solar system?
A question that always bugged me, even with the gravity forming the jump points theory, is what determines where the nodes lead?

 

Offline Starks

  • 29
Re: Where is/was the Sol node in our solar system?
Alpha Centauri is a triple star system...

It consists of:

Proxima Centauri (V645 Centauri)   Alpha Centauri A (Rigil Kentaurus; Toliman)   Alpha Centauri B (HD 128621)



A and B are binary stars.
« Last Edit: January 20, 2006, 02:42:27 am by LLivingLarge »
Formerly of the Dark Wings and Legion of Apocalypse

 

Offline aldo_14

  • Gunnery Control
  • 213
Re: Where is/was the Sol node in our solar system?
A question that always bugged me, even with the gravity forming the jump points theory, is what determines where the nodes lead?

Well, distance in subspace is non-relativistic (at least, the physics are, so I presume distance must be truncated too.. or time, perhaps.  Nuts.  That's not really an answer, then.....), so it could be the nodes are right next to each other in subspace itself.  IIRC nodes are described as being points where 'the fabric of subspace is strong enough to support subspace travel'; perhaps gravity has a role in directing those 'strands'; y'know, if a subspace connection is like a piece of string of a particular strength, and gravitational effect at each end drags and locks that strand-thing into position between the two apertures (perhaps the destruction of one end by the Lucifer/in FS2 being enough to weaken it and allow the strand to break free). 

Of course, that itself has an issue of what causes apertures to form and collapse as well as the specific pairings; the former could be that these little apertures form naturally, but only remain open when there is sufficient gravity to 'snap' the strands into place (with the caveat that even stable nodes collapse; although perhaps stuff like natural movement of stars in subspace or realspace can strain and break connections over long time periods).  The latter could be that it's just pot luck, in terms of relative subspace distance.

Absolutely no support or evidence for any of that, of course.  Could be that gravity is somehow converted to energy in subspace and 2 simulataneous random subspace aperture formations in the right place allow said gravity to create a conduit of energy that strengthens subspace for travel.  Or maybe you get a mini-black hole effect that pulls in atoms at either end and creates a tiny tunnel, which the travelling ships act to widen (as they do to the aperture when entering subspace).

 

Offline Black Wolf

  • Twisted Infinities
  • Global Moderator
  • 212
  • Hey! You! Get off-a my cloud!
    • Visit the TI homepage!
Re: Where is/was the Sol node in our solar system?
Proxima Centauri doesn't count - it's a brown dwarf orbiting out in the middle of nowhere that nobody cares about. So it counts, but can more or less be ignored.
TWISTED INFINITIES · SECTORGAME· FRONTLINES
Rarely Updated P3D.
Burn the heretic who killed F2S! Burn him, burn him!!- GalEmp

 

Offline watsisname

Re: Where is/was the Sol node in our solar system?
I always assumed that jump nodes would be locked into lagrange points.

Yeah, I thought that too.  It makes sense because the techroom says that they have some kind of dependence on "strong" gravitational fields, and they also seem to be located somewhat close to planets as well (if the system has planets, that is). 
Also, asteroid fields seem to be commonly centered near jump nodes, which would make sense if jump nodes are also naturally centered on stable lagrange  points.  (L4 and L5 lagrange points are stable)

Here's a decent picture showing locations of lagrange points in a 2 body system, like the Earth and moon:


As for the Sol jump point in FS1, It looks like it's either in orbit around the moon, or possibly at the L2 point. 

I somewhat doubt that :v: actually had lagrange points in mind when they decided on where to place jump points.  It is a cool curiousity though.
In my world of sleepers, everything will be erased.
I'll be your religion, your only endless ideal.
Slowly we crawl in the dark.
Swallowed by the seductive night.

 

Offline FireCrack

  • 210
  • meh...
Re: Where is/was the Sol node in our solar system?
L3 is in the wrong place in that picture...

Here's a better one

actualy, mabye not.
"When ink and pen in hands of men Inscribe your form, bipedal P They draw an altar on which God has slaughtered all stability, no eyes could ever soak in all the places you anoint, and yet to see you all at once we only need the point. Flirting with infinity, your geometric progeny that fit inside you oh so tight with triangles that feel so right."
3.141592653589793238462643383279502884197169399375105820974944 59230781640628620899862803482534211706...
"Your ever-constant homily says flaw is discipline, the patron saint of imperfection frees us from our sin. And if our transcendental lift shall find a final floor, then Man will know the death of God where wonder was before."

 

Offline WeatherOp

  • 29
  • I forged the ban hammer. What about that?
    • http://www.geocities.com/weather_op/pageone.html?1113100476773
Re: Where is/was the Sol node in our solar system?
This is kind of funny, this site was posted on the WX forums I go to.

http://www.physics.montana.edu/faculty/cornish/lagrange.html

Who posted it? Remember that thread I posted about the dude and his tunnels?. :lol:
Decent Blacksmith, Master procrastinator.

PHD in the field of Almost Finishing Projects.

 

Offline watsisname

Re: Where is/was the Sol node in our solar system?
 
L3 is in the wrong place in that picture...

Hmm...
I may be wrong about this, but I always thought that the placement of the L1 - L3 points would vary depending on the masses of the two objects.  For example, L1 could be further away in that sun-earth system because the sun is much more massive than the Earth, while for the Earth-moon system it would be closer because the moon has a larger relative mass to Earth's. 
...might be wrong though.  I'm not that good in this area of physics.  :sigh:
In my world of sleepers, everything will be erased.
I'll be your religion, your only endless ideal.
Slowly we crawl in the dark.
Swallowed by the seductive night.

 

Offline FireCrack

  • 210
  • meh...
Re: Where is/was the Sol node in our solar system?
^for two objects of masses near eachother you start getting major distortions like that, but variations that major make L4 and L5 unstable, and this is not the case here, or for any other two major bodies in our system.
actualy, mabye not.
"When ink and pen in hands of men Inscribe your form, bipedal P They draw an altar on which God has slaughtered all stability, no eyes could ever soak in all the places you anoint, and yet to see you all at once we only need the point. Flirting with infinity, your geometric progeny that fit inside you oh so tight with triangles that feel so right."
3.141592653589793238462643383279502884197169399375105820974944 59230781640628620899862803482534211706...
"Your ever-constant homily says flaw is discipline, the patron saint of imperfection frees us from our sin. And if our transcendental lift shall find a final floor, then Man will know the death of God where wonder was before."