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Author Topic: Enioch's naval shenanigans - RTW as Japan - [Image Heavy!]  (Read 29997 times)

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Offline Lepanto

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Re: Enioch's naval shenanigans - RTW as Japan - [Image Heavy!]
Ohhh. The soporific AI is finally throwing an actual challenge your way?

Looking forward to more complexities of naval construction, battles, and appropriate Kancolle reaction images!
"We have now reached the point where every goon with a grievance, every bitter bigot, merely has to place the prefix, 'I know this is not politically correct, but...' in front of the usual string of insults in order to be not just safe from criticism, but actually a card, a lad, even a hero. Conversely, to talk about poverty and inequality, to draw attention to the reality that discrimination and injustice are still facts of life, is to commit the sin of political correctness. Anti-PC has become the latest cover for creeps. It is a godsend for every curmudgeon and crank, from fascists to the merely smug."
Finian O'Toole, The Irish Times, 5 May 1994

Blue Planet: The Battle Captains: Missions starring the Admirals of BP: WiH
Frontlines 2334+2335: T-V War campaign
GVB Ammit: Vasudan strike bomber
Player-Controlled Capship Modding Tutorial

 

Offline Enioch

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Re: Enioch's naval shenanigans - RTW as Japan - [Image Heavy!]
I highly recommend a CL with 8 in guns and DDs with 6 in guns. Literally just stuffing the maximum gun size the game will allow on your boats makes for a lot of !!FUN!!

The ROF penalties for uvergfunning ships are huge this early in the game; a DD with 6 inch guns gets a 20% ROF penalty even in lategame. I'll see if I can make something remotely viable, but no promises

Ohhh. The soporific AI is finally throwing an actual challenge your way?

Looking forward to more complexities of naval construction, battles, and appropriate Kancolle reaction images!

The AI isn't soporific; it just has limited options, given that it's operating halfway around the world from its bases and has been savaged by my initial night assault. Plus, I'm playing strategic hard-mode (historical resources) but (usually) tactical easy mode (Captain's Mode), so my ships make fewer retarded mistakes (like charging into a BBs secondaries with a DD and then NOT firing torps).

Anyway, I'll do my best!

« Last Edit: December 02, 2016, 05:13:18 am by Enioch »
'Violence is the last refuge of the incompetent'  -Salvor Hardin, "Foundation"

So don't take a hammer to your computer. ;-)

 

Offline Enioch

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The sapphire blue Sea / on my eldest daughter's grave / Pain, cold and silence
So, battle line:





It's Naniwa and three DDs, travelling along their merry way.





Enemy spotted! It's one of their gunships. Could be a screening force for their cruiser. A quick check of the chronometer - we have 7 hours of combat ahead of us (i.e. 7 hours of running from the Hertha, if it ends up being her).



...or not. She looks to be alone. What the hell?



We chase it south....



...and we chase it north...



...until we lose it in the haze.

But there's the swampy coast of South Korea in front of her, so she can't run forever. Press on!





Found you.



We pin her against the coastline...



...and chase her to the west...



...and to the east...



...and back to the west.

Seriously, just DIE already.







NONONONONONO, c'mon, Akikaze, you're the eldest sister, you're the name ship, don't die on me, DON'T DIE, you can't leave your sisters alone, c'mon, limit flooding, LIMIT FLOODING!





YOU MOTHERF-







The mood is somber as we sail back to port. Naniwa stays on patrol - there may still be a cruiser out there and, if so, she wants it gone.



Yeah, no. Look, Mr. Foreign Secretary, if you dare sign any peace treaty right now, I will personally blow your head off with a 4'' rifle.



Why, hello there. Could that be the Hertha? Naniwa doesn't give a flying ****. She just lost a destroyer and she's out for blood.





Up close and personal, in the middle of heavy rain. Weather to fit the mood.





How DARE you send crap like this against us.







Ancient legends say the rank a fallen warrior held
depended on the honour guard of foes that one had felled
and so, in tardy tribute to the one we couldn't save,
we'll lay your fiery deaths like crimson flowers on her grave.




For Akizake, you Gaijin bastards.
« Last Edit: June 18, 2018, 07:30:24 pm by Enioch »
'Violence is the last refuge of the incompetent'  -Salvor Hardin, "Foundation"

So don't take a hammer to your computer. ;-)

 

Offline StarSlayer

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Re: Enioch's naval shenanigans - RTW as Japan - [Image Heavy!]
On a side note why do the the kancolle Tenryū CLs look like they have Fleet of Fog parts where the rest of the characters seem to be historical?
“Think lightly of yourself and deeply of the world”

 

Offline Enioch

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Re: Enioch's naval shenanigans - RTW as Japan - [Image Heavy!]
Beats me. I don't think there has been an official eplanation.
'Violence is the last refuge of the incompetent'  -Salvor Hardin, "Foundation"

So don't take a hammer to your computer. ;-)

 

Offline Lorric

  • 212
Re: Enioch's naval shenanigans - RTW as Japan - [Image Heavy!]
Ohhh. The soporific AI is finally throwing an actual challenge your way?

Looking forward to more complexities of naval construction, battles, and appropriate Kancolle reaction images!
I wondered what the images were from, I was intrigued by them.

So someone took the whole calling ships "she" thing very literally it seems. Anime is frequently so strange to me. But I'm enjoying the style of this thread.

 

Offline Enioch

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Re: Enioch's naval shenanigans - RTW as Japan - [Image Heavy!]
You weren't familiar with Kancolle?  :lol:

Welcome to the wonderful world of kanmusu or 'shipgirls'. Beware of Akagi, she's known to bite when hungry. And if Fubuki starts calling you 'senpai' run.

'Violence is the last refuge of the incompetent'  -Salvor Hardin, "Foundation"

So don't take a hammer to your computer. ;-)

 

Offline Enioch

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Alle Ihre Basen sind gehoehren uns
After this slightly bloody interlude, we turn to the strategic map. We need to plan our overall strategy.



Note that the Marianas now proudly fly the Rising Sun. Also note that the Germans still have holdings in Tsingtaou, North Korea, the Caroline Islands (i.e. Truk) and the Bismarck Archipelago. This is where we should be focusing our efforts, to completely kick them out of our sphere of influence. Also also note that our intelligence officers have tracked the movement of another battleship to Tsingtaou, where it met the Hertha. The Germans have two heavy hitters on our doorstep. Thankfully, both Fuso and Hatsuse are standing by to engage their battle-line if it should poke out and the Admiralty is confident in their superiority over the German analogues.



Our intelligence officers have also been keeping a close eye on the French and Russians, just in case the war spills over. With a honeypot scheme, one of our best female operatives manages to acquire the complete blueprints of their new battleships.



Which is completely inferior to the Fusos in every aspect but its guns. So, no worries there.



Vague happy noises come from our R & D department. Apparently, they have an experimental submersible vehicle and they've been sailing it around (and under) Kuro harbour. It is interesting in its implications, but whether it will turn out to be a toy or a revolution in naval warfare remains to be seen.





Meanwhile, the German raiders continue to make a nuisance of themselves. Izumi and Naniwa's crews are eager to hunt them down, but the Admiralty comes down on them like a ton of bricks. These are armoured cruisers (possibly Herthas) and we cannot risk our scouts against them. Wait.



Then, agents in Tsingtaou report that the German fleet has set sail, with the intention of bombarding coastal defenses. The Admiralty deploys scouting elements to find them and guide the Fusos on an interception.



The operation is a partial succes. Naniwa tracks them down near Sasebo and the Fusos arrive mid-bombardment. The Germans disengage under cover of nightfall. The damage to the coastal installations is minimal and there are no casualties among the merchant shipping.



Then, the Germans plead for peace. A council is held, in which the Admiralty pushes for the continuation of the war; but the Army is exhausted and the Emperor is concerned that, if Germany continues her raiding campaigns, there might be a turnaround. Right now, they're offering satisfactory reparations; it would be in Nippon's best interest to accept and grant them their peace.



Peace is signed, on the 14th of June, 1902, on board the battleship Fuso, in Tsingtaou harbour. The terms are hugely favourable to Japan; Geermany acknowledges its occupation of the Marianas and also offers Truk and Tsingtaou itself, the jewel of northern China, as reparations. Week-long celebrations are held throughout Japan.

This is a peace that shakes the world. For the first time, an Oriental power has claimed victory over and dictated terms to a European colonialist nation. The foundations of the world tremble. The British observe with a raised eyebrow and cackle that their ships, even on the hands of the Japanese, can outperform the Kaiser's floating junk, ignoring that not a single battleship engagement was fought. The French and Russians, the old kids in the block who have just seen an uppity newcomer beat down their neighbour are very worried but limit themselves to vaguely condemnative statements and subtle economic warfare.




The Emperor and his cabinet institute a rather loose colonial system in the occupied areas. There are long-standing grievances between the Japanes and the Chinese and it is thought that attempting to enforce the Emperor's rule by force will only be met with open rebellion. Instead, local governors are appointed and the European Gaijin are kicked out of any position of authority over the following years. Similar systems are put in place in the other Pacific holdings, with indigenous persons of note being placed in positions of authority and recognised as high officials of the Empire. Interestingly, the systems seems to be working. The local populations were not particularly fond of the Europeans and the gentle hand (and it is a gentle hand) of the Empire seems to be infinitely preferrable.



Of course, these social and political developments require the Empire to dig deep into its pockets and the naval budget is the first to suffer in peacetime.





Nevertheless, the upcoming months are productive. First, an overview of the construction techniques in the Tsingtaou yards shows that the Chinese workers have developed interesting variations on riveting techniques. They are encouraged (with high wages and high-ranking positions) to oversee their application in the naval yards.



With the immediate threat of war over, the fleet dials down its training regimen. It becomes possible to economise almost half a million monthly, a very respectable amount.







That money flows into R & D and infrastructure. New docks are completed; it is finally possible to drydock our Fusos withour making them travel halfway around the world, to Britain. Our scientists present us with improved AP shells and, perhaps more significantly, wheel out their submarine prototype. It's slow and has limited range, but it packs a good punch with the weapon that most appeals to the soul of the Japanes sailor: Torpedoes!



Of course, we can only afford four, for now.



Our 11'' guns are now up to international standards. Not particularly helpful, as we're not fielding any 11'' ships, nor are we planning to, but lessons learned might help with other calibers.



And then, November 1902 hits us with the worst recession in recent years; apparently, Japan has bitten off more than it can chew and, as the winter approaches, there are people sleeping in the streets. This is the winter that will make or break the delicate alliance that Japan is trying to build in East Asia; and Nippon responds beautifully, with an extended campaing of charity and social reforms. What is notable to the naval historian  is the massive donations by the Imperial Family to private charity organisations throughout the Empire's holdings; and the usage of ships in foreign stations as accommodation for the homeless and unemployed. Hatsuse becomes known as the 'Mother of Sasebo', for packing more than a thousand mothers and children into her holds throughout the winter.



Of course, the navy budget suffers another blow, although things could be worse.



As winter passes, the youngest of the Izumi sisters rolls off the yards and starts her training cruise. Say hello to Takachiho, everyone!



And our designers implement new safety measures to keep our engines un-exploded, a valued characteristic, from what our officers are given to understand.



With funds from Takachiho freed up, the first Asanagis are laid down; a small flotilla of four ships for a start, just to test the design. They should hit the water in less than a year.



And, after their rough treatment during the crisis, it is thought the two Fusos have earned a period in drydock, for essential maintenance. Thankfully, the R & D department vetoes the project. They're tantilizingly close to unlocking critical improvements in firing control technologies and they insist that any repairs should wait until the new system can be implemented. The Admiralty agrees, and Fuso and Hatsuse keep their keels wet for a few more months.



The Brits are quite interested in our progress and offer to sell us improved rangefinders; the R & D people jump at the opportunity and funds are allocated.



However, this leads to a cock-up with the handling of finances. The Navy has to default on a month's salary payments for some of its personnel; the budget is back in the black in the next month, but the scandal remains a tarnish on the Admiralty's record and an embarrassment for a good while. A quiet decision is made, behind the scenes: Never again.



The Navy finds the opportunity to redeem itself in May, when a minor colonial crisis erupts in Sumatra, over territorial waters with the Vietamese. It is not hard to see France pulling the strings from behind the scene. Izumi and Izumo are on the spot and their captains are instructed to provide all the necessary support to the Sumatran administration - unconditionally. Their uncompromising stance greatly enhances the image of the Navy among the locals; so does the fact that a large part of the Izumo's crew are natives, including First Lieutenant Bambang, one of the first wartime graduates of the Kaigun Heigakkō academy.



Then, later in the year, during the celebrations for the anniversary of King Edward VII's coronation, a Russian destroyer rams Fuso (who was hosting the Japanese diplomatic delegation) in Spithead. The event incenses the Admiralty who see in it an act of attempted sabotage and an 'accidental' sinking of the pride of their navy; the British stand behind the Japanese, harshly critisizing Russian seamanship. Fuso suffers minimal damage; the Russian destroyer spends four months in drydock. Tensions with Russia rise; Albion, on the other hand, seems firmly on the side of the Japanese.



In November, a committee of Chinese and Japanese naval engineers present the Admiralty with the design of a fully functional 'wing' turret, capable of bearing up to 10'' guns. They also present theoretical designs of 'enhanced' battleships, with a 12'' main battery (similar to that borne by the Fusos) complemented by massive secondary turrets of 10'' guns. The ship would have a theoretical broadside of 4 12 inchers and 4 10 inchers, a formidable armament. The design is benched, however, as neither the navy's budget nor its drydocks can support such a behemoth of a ship.



New developments in AP projectiles, on the other hand, are always welcome.



And then our first submarines are commissioned. The Navy is eager to experiment with these 'boats'. They quickly become quite prestigious postings and enjoy a 'ninja' mystique; their crews are some of the most egalitarian in the fleet. Command posts are given to a Japanese , two Manchu and a Polynesian officer and their crews are a multi-ethnic melting pot.



And then, FINALLY, with a ten-month delay, our scientists and engineers present us with a working design to centrally coordinate not just the rangefinder information, but all firing calculations. Time to truly bring our ships into the 20th century.
« Last Edit: June 18, 2018, 07:30:54 pm by Enioch »
'Violence is the last refuge of the incompetent'  -Salvor Hardin, "Foundation"

So don't take a hammer to your computer. ;-)

 

Offline Lorric

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Re: Enioch's naval shenanigans - RTW as Japan - [Image Heavy!]
You weren't familiar with Kancolle?  :lol:

Welcome to the wonderful world of kanmusu or 'shipgirls'. Beware of Akagi, she's known to bite when hungry. And if Fubuki starts calling you 'senpai' run.
Now that I have had a look at what this is, it reminds me very much of something I stumbled across a few months ago, Hyperdimension Neptunia. That too started humbly as a game, filled it's universe with a 100% female cast of largely tweenage-looking girls anthropomorphised off of inanimate objects, and has since picked up a seemingly sizeable following, and spawned an anime, manga and more games.

I said stumbled across, but it's more like repeatedly thrown in my path to stumble over until I stopped to have a closer look, because it's hard not to see it when you browse the playstation store when they pump out so much DLC and so many games. Just pages and pages of outfits and accessories and such. It's probably for number of single items in there the game that has the most. It's actually a pretty good way to get noticed since in the end I was just like alright, just what the hell is this? after having ignored them for a long time.

I don't know if it's a Japanese thing to do this or if these two things are unusual.

 

Offline Spoon

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Re: Enioch's naval shenanigans - RTW as Japan - [Image Heavy!]
I wish I had a Fubuki calling me Senpai.

(I'm still following the thread with great interest)
Urutorahappī!!

[02:42] <@Axem> spoon somethings wrong
[02:42] <@Axem> critically wrong
[02:42] <@Axem> im happy with these missions now
[02:44] <@Axem> well
[02:44] <@Axem> with 2 of them

 

Offline Enioch

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Re: Enioch's naval shenanigans - RTW as Japan - [Image Heavy!]
Well, everybody knows of your deviant tendencies, Spoon. (j/k, just to make sure I don't offend anyone)

For the uninitiated, this is Fubuki's 'Senpai face':

http://i.imgur.com/TIE2Szb.jpg

Good to hear that people care. I'll try to keep it interesting!  :nod:
'Violence is the last refuge of the incompetent'  -Salvor Hardin, "Foundation"

So don't take a hammer to your computer. ;-)

 

Offline Spoon

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Re: Enioch's naval shenanigans - RTW as Japan - [Image Heavy!]
Don't you just want to pinch those cheeks and praise her for trying so hard? Sometimes I even think about holding hands with her.
Urutorahappī!!

[02:42] <@Axem> spoon somethings wrong
[02:42] <@Axem> critically wrong
[02:42] <@Axem> im happy with these missions now
[02:44] <@Axem> well
[02:44] <@Axem> with 2 of them

 

Offline Enioch

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Peace, Prosperity and Rising Tension


So, the scientists also provide the Navy with a prototype of the Type 6 torpedo. Which is a notable improvement over earlier models in both range and speed. Destroyer commanders were ecstatic.



But the priority for the navy was to modernise their battleships. Fuso and Hatsuse were placed in the (newly constructed, spick and span) drydocks in Kure and Sasebo respectively and the local engineers got hard at work, replacing the worn-out machinery, improving minor systems and, most importantly, fitting the new Central Firing systems.



The construction of the third Asama-class cruiser was also extended over an extra month, to give the yardhands time to fit in the new improvement.



High explosive shells were also improved during this period; new chemical processes allowed the manufacture of higher-yield explosives and, most importantly, safer fuzes.



That said, the economic crisis had seriously impacted the effectiveness of the Navy. Yearly spending and tonnage ranked Nippon far behind her contemporaries. This caused considerable concern, as the government felt that the Armed Forces were incapable of protecting the safety of the Empire's citizens or that of her allies.







It was in this climate of uncertainty that the first Asanagi-class destroyers were launched; that new advances in opticts and pneumatics allowed the implementation of high-quality periscopes in the small Japanese submarine fleet; and that Fuso and Hatsuse were re-launched, changed and improved in some ways, yet the same in all the ways that mattered to the nervous populace.



And then, Spring came, and the Ministry of Finance published its findings on the state of the economy.



The numbers were staggering - to the point that it was suspected by foreign powers that Japan was falsifying its budget. And yet the data were there, for everyone to see. Unemployment - that massive spectre looming over Japan - was down eight percent, partly thanks to the Navy hiring; average income had gone up by fourteen percent, as the soldiers and sailors returned to their work or found new employment. New technologies introduced from the West or developed in Japan and the availability of labour had led to industry skyrocketing in a few short months. Maritime trade bloomed in Southeast Asia. The oil fields' production was up twelve percent compared to their pre-war levels.

And, as the Ministry of Foreign Affairs reported, approval of Japan's policies among her closeby allies and protectorates, even among the native populations, was at an all-time high.

It was working



Seemingly overnight, the Navy's budget jumped up by sixteen percent.



That said, not all news were good. Internal inquiries noted signs of a break-in in the R&D facilities. The culprits were never found and nothing appeared to be stolen. Yet it was clear that security had to be improved - and the officer responsible was harshly reprimended.



Leaving the gunboats, destroyers and battleships to handle coastal patrols, and taking advantage of the peaceful times, the Navy re-fitted the entirety of its cruiser force with Central Firing systems. It was a relative quick process; and it allowed the extensive workforce in the new docks to bond together into a well-oiled machine.



Kure and Yokosuka, in particular, quickly became known as the 'cities that never slept'. The yards worked 'round the clock, under the glare of the new electric lights. By July, the Izumis were ready; by August, so were the Asamas.



In July, a delegation from the USA arrived in Japan, to observe the staggering developments in the Land of the Rising Sun. They were very much impressed with the electrification works that were ongoing in urban Industrial Zones; and stunned by the rapid development of Japan's shipbuilding industry. Technologies were exchanged; the Japanese navy, most importantly, got the licence to the American 8-inch-45 caliber guns. While the Americans considered these guns relatively worthless at the time, the Japanese further improved on the design and ended up with the 203mm / 53 caliber rifle, which remained a superb naval gun well into the 1940s.





Also, the summer proved to be a perfect season for naval trials. The Asanagi destroyers proved themselves exceptional minelaying platforms and new doctrines were developed at the time; however, destroyers would not get dedicated mine racks for many years to come.

New submarine designs were also introduced: these featured 'diving planes', similar to the find of a fish or horizotal rudders, allowing the submarines to better adjust its diving angle.



Finally, lessons learned from the war were implemented into the construction of two Unebi-class cruisers. Japan was short on raiders, and these ships would fill this role. They were based on expanded Izumi hulls, with the same armament, but with bigger fuel stores and heavier, sturdier engines. Their construction was marked as high-priority and, with the incentive of pay bonuses, the yardhands jumped to it with satisfaction.



In October, tensions would rise again, as the French administration of Cochin China started extending feelers toward Thailand, an ally of Japan. The local government requested Japan to take an official stance on the matter. Within the week, Asama, Izumi and Hatsuse were on-station near the eastern Thai borders, based off Sumatra. The French withdrew, but the incident soured relations for good. Japan now knew who her enemy would be and knew to prepare for the inevitable conflict.



As a totally unrelated matter, that hd nothing to do with a display of power and military discipline; or a field test of their new targeting systems, the IJN organised its first fleet-wide shooting competition, to be held in three subsequent phases in Sasebo, Tsingtaou and Sumatra. It was a grand event, attended by many civilians in a three-day festival on each site; it is impossible to know with certainty how many people witnessed it, but estimates range well over three million onlookers in total. Details on the proceedings were also telegraphed and announced hourly to all allied nations and protectorates; and it was not a rare sight for huge crowds to gather near the telegraph offices and for bookies to run bets throughout the competition days. There were regional favourites and darlings; and it was oh so exciting and it came down to the wire between Izumi, Hatsuse and Fuso, before the latter scored an amazing victory with a 19,000-yard bullseye, which had the Kure workers dancing in the streets in celebration.



Because she's Fuso.





In early Winter, the foundries reported that, by implementing new techniques, armour weight could be slightly reduced with no sacrifice in protection. And the engineer bureau submitted the designs for the Asanagi Kai destroyers, which could squeeze an extra knot out of the otherwise identical hull and armament.



And in February, a gaggle of ship designers, including a recent returnee from England barged into the Admiralty, with theoretical designs of a three-turret battleship, which left the High Command reeling.



There were rumours that Great Britain was experimenting with what they called 'battlecruisers'; but their designs were top secret. Perhaps this had something to do with it? Funding was immediately allocated to the 'Central Turrets' project. Japan could no longer lead, but she could follow; and if other would or could not, they would be left behind.



Like the Italians, for instance, who approached the Admiralty with the intent of purchasing a licence for the Japanese Central Firing systems. This was a cold shower for the Japanese - for the Italian delegation made manifest every rude colonialist Gaijin stereotype. They were quickly but politely sent packing and nothing of value was lost; but it reminded the Japanese and their allies of how the West (or some parts of it) still viewed them as: savages, ready to be bought with glinting beads, force-fed opium, or be brought to heel with gunboat diplomacy.

This was unacceptable.







And then May came, with a bounty of reports from the yards; the engineers; the mechanics. Gun mount pneumatics were improved, to allow faster training onto the target. Machinery was made more efficient. Japanese steel became lighter and stronger. And more importantly, the 'Central Turrets' project delivered, with a hoard of ship designs that would revolutionise naval warfare for ever.



And, literally overnight, Fuso and Hatsuse, the Prides of the Fleet, the magnificent Lady of China and the beloved Mother of Sasebo were made obsolete; shades of themselves; relics of a bygone era, growing increasingly irrelevant with every passing day.

The time of the Battleships is past. The time of the Dreadnoughts and Battlecruisers is at hand.

-END PART 1-




« Last Edit: June 18, 2018, 07:31:27 pm by Enioch »
'Violence is the last refuge of the incompetent'  -Salvor Hardin, "Foundation"

So don't take a hammer to your computer. ;-)

 

Offline Lorric

  • 212
Re: Enioch's naval shenanigans - RTW as Japan - [Image Heavy!]
I reckon this is what the future looks like.


With added tweenage anime girls.

 

Offline Enioch

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  • Alternative History Word Writer
Re: Enioch's naval shenanigans - RTW as Japan - [Image Heavy!]
Surprisingly accurate.

Also:

Don't you just want to pinch those cheeks and praise her for trying so hard? Sometimes I even think about holding hands with her.

E-Ecchi! Baka! Hentai! Keep your perverted thoughts out of my thread.
« Last Edit: December 02, 2016, 09:50:02 pm by Enioch »
'Violence is the last refuge of the incompetent'  -Salvor Hardin, "Foundation"

So don't take a hammer to your computer. ;-)

 

Offline Lorric

  • 212
Re: Enioch's naval shenanigans - RTW as Japan - [Image Heavy!]
Get those girls tanked up with some of this stuff.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/scotland/north_east/8517607.stm

 

Offline Enioch

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Re: Enioch's naval shenanigans - RTW as Japan - [Image Heavy!]
Unfortunately, ethanol boilers are  not yet researched and, also, I like my ships to sail straight.

although, holy crap, 40-odd proof? Wow.
'Violence is the last refuge of the incompetent'  -Salvor Hardin, "Foundation"

So don't take a hammer to your computer. ;-)

 

Offline Enioch

  • 210
  • Alternative History Word Writer
- PART 2 -
The Rise of the Battlecruiser



In May 1905, the Admiralty ordered design studies for a Battlecruiser; a testbed design, meant to introduce the new technologies to Japan and evaluate their actual viablity. The new ship was to sail at 26 knots (fast enough to overtake any heavy cruiser and outrun any battleship) and was to be armed with at least six of the 'Type 3' 11'' guns of local manufacture.

The 'Tsukuba' design, pictured above, was the design eventually chosen. Note its still-heavy armour of 10''; this would make it easily capable of dealing with predreads at mid- to low ranges. Also note the massive 'wing' 10'' turrets, meant to complement its main armament. At 20k tons, this was the biggest warship ever laid down in Japan.

However, construction did not start immediately. The Admiralty was not eager to embark on such a project without first making sure that they had the budget to bring it to completion. The Admirals brought their concerns to the Emperor himself; the importance of the project was highlighted and acknowledged and discussions started on how best to secure the necessary funds.



Note that Tsukuba would be consideerably smaller (around 3k tons) than the British battlecruisers. This was an unfortunate effect of the still-developing Japanese shipbuilding industry; but, if all went well, the new generation of battlecruisers would be larger and more competitive.



In July 1905, the Emperor addressed the people of the Japanese Empire, its Allies and its Protectorates, with a letter that was published in the press and distributed as leaflets. He spoke of the future and how the Southeast Asia Alliance could assume a leading role in it; of the accomplishments of its people; of the pride he held in his heart for what they had achieved. He also spoke of Tsukuba, the ship that would bring the Fleet into the future.

The reaction of the people went beyond the Admiralty's wildest dreams:



Fifty million were collected in what proved to be the largest public subscription campaign in the Empire's history. The money flowed in from all members of the Alliance; moreso when it became known that any participant would earn the right to have their name permanently engraved in the 'Tsukuba' dock in Yokosuka, where the ship was to be built.


 
Construction began immediately.





At the same time, the engineers of the Alliance introduced a fully mechanised system for gun loading, which was integrated into the Tsukuba design and retrofitted onto the earlier ships; they also presented the Admiralty with a working prototype of the 'Type 9' torpedo, which carried much-improved gyroscopes for better, faster and straighter running.



Yet more funding was allocated to expanding the docks; the Navy wanted to catch up with the Brits as soon as possible. The galvanised private shipbuilders learned about this and immediately contributed the funds for an expansion of the Kure yards of 1000 tons beyond the Admiralty's plans.





In September, the new batch of coastal subs were commissioned. The Silent Service, as it came to be known, remained one of the more prestigious postings in the Navy. A two-year stint in a submarine was enough to make an officer's career and the esprit de corps shown by the submariners was notably above and beyond the other navy branches.





During that time, Military Intelligence deployed agents in all major foreign powers, to keep tabs on their battlecruiser progress. Unfortunately, there were some fiascos, but the Alliance was such a varied multi-ethnic community by now that it was difficult to prove its involvement when two of its agents were captured in Russia and Germany.



In their constant efforts to improve the accuracy of their guns, the fleet also introduced the Yamaha range calculator which determined the aggregate effect on gun range attributable to a number of factors. This was a world first; the British Dreyer calculator would still take a year to be implemented.



In December, the Emperor visited Yokosuka and inspected the progress made in the construction of Tsukuba. It is said that he was ecstatic and lavished praise onto his Admirals and the engineers. The entire nation followed suit. Notably, throughout the Alliance, 'Tsukuba Calendars' were sold, where the launching date of Tsukuba would be counted down to. This was the "peoples' ship" and the people followed its conception, building and birth with bated breath.



Thus we come to one of the most criticised decisions of the Navy in the early 20th century. When the Italian ship manufacturer La Spezia approached the Sasebo yards with an offer of a technology sharing agreement, the Navy considered their proposal. It was clear that the Italians stood to gain more than they would offer; but the Alliance was, notably, short on friends. And so, just after the Christian New Year, the agreement that would see Japan's tehnology siphoned off to the West was signed, in exchange for vague promises.



Japan would learn her lesson well.



By March, reports were coming in that the first British BCs would leave their slipways in eight months. Tsukuba was two years away from completion, but that was hardly reason to worry, as no other nation was building a BC yet and Japan had no intention of antagonising the Grand Fleet.



The Unebis, on the other hand, were finally ready and set off on their shakedown cruises.



And thus we come to the disastrous events that took place in 1906, during the coronation of King Haakon VII of Norway. Izumo was representing Japan in Trondheim, when the old Russian cruiser Archangel rammed her in the starboard bow, in an all-too-familiar repeat of the Fuso incident. Both ships suffered minimal damage, but the Government and Navy were incensed. Secretary of Naval Affairs Hideyara was said to have snidely remarked "I wonder whether their vodka has so addled their brains that they find our ships attractive in some way?"



Tensions between the two countries, obviously, skyrocketed.



In April, a lobby of steel manufacturers approached Vice Admirals Fujiwara and asked him to intercede with the Emperor for an increase in Naval spending. They presented a solid case, but were tactless enough to accompany it with a substantial bribe. They could not have picked a worse person to approach. They were nearly thrown out of his office; witnesses state that he was nearly apoplectic with rage. The news spread and the Admiral became briefly known as the 'Incorruptible'.



The shakedown cruises of the Unebis proved them to be good, reliable designs; so, in May, the Admiralty ordered a third ship of the class, meant to patrol the Polynesian archipelago. Yaeyama would be crewed and captained almost purely by natives.



May 1906 will also stay in history because of Vice Admiral Fujiwara's speech in the annual gathering of the Navy League. In his short but memorable speech, the 'Incorruptible' thundered against the imperialist actions of the French, who had twice now threatened the security of Japan's Allies in the Asian mainland and in Sumatra. The Navy and Government stood behind his words, even after France lodged a semi-official protest; Tensions, again, spiked.



In June, ships were refitted with new fire control 'tops'. The Admiralty being satisfied with their ships' accuracy at this point, they declared that priority should be given to the development of destroyers in the future.



Finally, June 1906 saw the opening of several industrial complexes in Sasebo, Kure and Palembang. Funds flowed in; unemployment in these areas dropped to under three percent. Power plants were built, with large turbines providing electricity to thousands. These were, truly, boom times for the Alliance.




« Last Edit: June 18, 2018, 07:31:58 pm by Enioch »
'Violence is the last refuge of the incompetent'  -Salvor Hardin, "Foundation"

So don't take a hammer to your computer. ;-)

 

Offline Spoon

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Re: Enioch's naval shenanigans - RTW as Japan - [Image Heavy!]
War with the baguettes seems inevitable!
Urutorahappī!!

[02:42] <@Axem> spoon somethings wrong
[02:42] <@Axem> critically wrong
[02:42] <@Axem> im happy with these missions now
[02:44] <@Axem> well
[02:44] <@Axem> with 2 of them

 

Offline Enioch

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Re: Enioch's naval shenanigans - RTW as Japan - [Image Heavy!]
>Implying a desire to avoid it.

>ERROR 404: desire not found.
'Violence is the last refuge of the incompetent'  -Salvor Hardin, "Foundation"

So don't take a hammer to your computer. ;-)