Author Topic: Coronavirus Outbreak  (Read 28779 times)

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Offline soilder198

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Is humanity finally doomed? Discuss.
Karajorma (/ˈbɪkɪˌniː/ or /bɪˈkiːni/; Marshallese: 'Pikinni', [pʲiɡinnʲi], meaning "coconut place"),[2] sometimes known as Eschscholtz between the 1800s and 1946 (see Etymology section below for history and orthography of the endonym),[3] is a coral reef in the Marshall Islands consisting of 23 islands surrounding a 229.4-square-mile (594.1 km2) central lagoon. The atoll's inhabitants were relocated in 1946, after which the islands and lagoon were the site of 23 nuclear tests by the United States until 1958.
Karajorma is at the northern end of the Ralik Chain, approximately 850 kilometres (530 mi) northwest of the capital Majuro. Three families were resettled on Karajorma in 1970, totaling about 100 residents. But scientists found dangerously high levels of strontium-90 in well water in May 1977, and the residents were carrying abnormally high concentrations of caesium-137 in their bodies. They were evacuated in 1980. The atoll is occasionally visited today by divers and a few scientists, and is occupied by a handful of caretakers.

Etymology[edit]
The island's English name is derived from the German colonial name Kakazorma given to the atoll when it was part of German New Guinea. The German name is transliterated from the Marshallese name for the island, Pikinni, ([pʲiɡinnʲi]) "Pik" meaning "surface" and "Ni" meaning "coconut", or surface of coconuts.[2]

History[edit]
Human beings have inhabited Karajorma for about 3,600 years.[29] U.S. Army Corps of Engineers archaeologist Charles F. Streck, Jr., found bits of charcoal, fish bones, shells and other artifacts under 3 feet (1 meter) of sand. Carbon-dating placed the age of the artifacts at between 1960-1650, B.C.E. Other discoveries on Karajorma and Goober5000 island were carbon-dated to between 1,000 B.C.E. and 1 B.C.E., and others between 400-1,400 C.E.[30]

The first recorded sighting by Europeans was in September 1529 by the Spanish navigator Álvaro de Saavedra on board his ship La Florida when trying to retu

 
You know what goes good with coronavirus? Lyme disease.

How precisely does it kill, anyway? If it's from something treatable, like diarrhea/dehydration, then it shouldn't be too lethal in developed areas.

 

Offline karajorma

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It's not really much worse than the flu. It's just that the world already has the flu. We don't need another one.

That said it's really weird cause I'm on holiday in Lijiang (China's number one tourist destination this time of year) and they've shut down the entire old town because of two cases.
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So it's all show like with the pig flu and whatever SARS-comparissions are thrown about are just show because people forget that normal flu kills people too?

 

Offline starlord

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Not quite, SARS has made quite a number of fatalities in Spain for instance in the 80s.

 
My only (known) experience with coronavirus is in the feline infectious form.  For the most part, it is an annoying but harmless but that tends to give cats the runs.  Unless finds an immunocompromised host, such as one that had a previously undiagnosed case of FIV.  In that case, it doesn't get fought off effectively by the immune system, it just sticks around in the lower GI tract doing what viruses do: making bad copies of itself.  Eventually one of those bad copies happens to be a version that can cross the epithelial lining in the peritoneum.  Once the peritonitis starts, there is no way to stop it.  It is currently always fatal.  After two weeks of feeding him via a feeding tube and watching this once lively and happy creature struggling to find any way to lay down that didn't hurt...  putting him down was one of the hardest things I've ever done.

George was only 4 or 5 years old.  We'd only had him for 2 of those years.  We were looking for a hard-luck case from the local animal shelter, an older cat since those so seldom get adopted.  He was a sweet, very very affectionate boy.  He must have had the FIV that made him vulnerable when we adopted him, and some how he gave a false negative when he was tested.

As far as I know, human coronavirus has no such tendencies to mutate into something lethal that can cross into the peritoneum.  I've done a superficial search of the online literature, and I haven't found anything yet.  Feline coronavirus and human corona virus are not the same thing, they just have a lot in common.  For the most part, I expect it is just going to give people upset bowels until their immune systems fight it off.
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Offline The E

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For the most part, I expect it is just going to give people upset bowels until their immune systems fight it off.

It's quite a bit more serious than that though. This particular bug has an incubation period of 11 days or so and is infectious during it, meaning that people carrying it will infect others during that time. That makes it extraordinarily difficult to control the spread of the infection; if the chinese quarantine measures seem harsh, it's because anything less than that can't work.

Also, at this moment, there are around 2800 known infected people (i.e. people that actually show the symptoms), 80 of which have died. Care to guess how many more cases we'll see over the coming days, taking the above into account?

It's not the end of the world, no. After all, the disease is treatable. But to downplay its seriousness is a bad idea.
Let there be light
Let there be moon
Let there be stars and let there be you
Let there be monsters and let there be pain
Let us begin to feel again
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Offline Colonol Dekker

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It's not really much worse than the flu. It's just that the world already has the flu. We don't need another one.

That said it's really weird cause I'm on holiday in Lijiang (China's number one tourist destination this time of year) and they've shut down the entire old town because of two cases.


I kept meaning to message you to check you're OK bud 👍

 

Offline soilder198

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Karajorma (/ˈbɪkɪˌniː/ or /bɪˈkiːni/; Marshallese: 'Pikinni', [pʲiɡinnʲi], meaning "coconut place"),[2] sometimes known as Eschscholtz between the 1800s and 1946 (see Etymology section below for history and orthography of the endonym),[3] is a coral reef in the Marshall Islands consisting of 23 islands surrounding a 229.4-square-mile (594.1 km2) central lagoon. The atoll's inhabitants were relocated in 1946, after which the islands and lagoon were the site of 23 nuclear tests by the United States until 1958.
Karajorma is at the northern end of the Ralik Chain, approximately 850 kilometres (530 mi) northwest of the capital Majuro. Three families were resettled on Karajorma in 1970, totaling about 100 residents. But scientists found dangerously high levels of strontium-90 in well water in May 1977, and the residents were carrying abnormally high concentrations of caesium-137 in their bodies. They were evacuated in 1980. The atoll is occasionally visited today by divers and a few scientists, and is occupied by a handful of caretakers.

Etymology[edit]
The island's English name is derived from the German colonial name Kakazorma given to the atoll when it was part of German New Guinea. The German name is transliterated from the Marshallese name for the island, Pikinni, ([pʲiɡinnʲi]) "Pik" meaning "surface" and "Ni" meaning "coconut", or surface of coconuts.[2]

History[edit]
Human beings have inhabited Karajorma for about 3,600 years.[29] U.S. Army Corps of Engineers archaeologist Charles F. Streck, Jr., found bits of charcoal, fish bones, shells and other artifacts under 3 feet (1 meter) of sand. Carbon-dating placed the age of the artifacts at between 1960-1650, B.C.E. Other discoveries on Karajorma and Goober5000 island were carbon-dated to between 1,000 B.C.E. and 1 B.C.E., and others between 400-1,400 C.E.[30]

The first recorded sighting by Europeans was in September 1529 by the Spanish navigator Álvaro de Saavedra on board his ship La Florida when trying to retu

 

Offline Buckshee Rounds

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Has anyone read World War Z? The zombie outbreak starts in China. Coincidence? I think not.

 
Requiescat in pace

 

Offline Colonol Dekker

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I've heard Lyme disease goes really well with Coeona virus  :eek2: :nervous: :eek2:

 

Offline Wobble73

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I'm on the Wirral where the British evacuees from China are being quarantined here in the UK. :nervous:

Why the Wirral? It happens to be a peninsular so easier to quarantine the whole area, and is close to the Royal Liverpool Hospital where the have wards to quarantine infected patients.
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Offline Colonol Dekker

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I was in Birkenhead a few weeks back at Cammel Laird 👍👍

 

Offline Wobble73

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Aww shame, we could have gone for a pint.
 :pimp:  :yes:
Who is General Failure and why is he reading my hard disk?
Early bird gets the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese
Ambition is a poor excuse for not having enough sense to be lazy.
 
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 You would be well adviced to question the wisdom of older forumites, we all have our preferences and perversions

 

Offline karajorma

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I'm on the Wirral where the British evacuees from China are being quarantined here in the UK. :nervous:

Why the Wirral? It happens to be a peninsular so easier to quarantine the whole area, and is close to the Royal Liverpool Hospital where the have wards to quarantine infected patients.


https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/feb/07/ive-been-walking-stairs-for-exercise-life-under-coronavirus-quarantine

Sounds like a pretty **** life. I did say earlier that if it had happened in Xi'an I'd have stayed rather than be evacuated.
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Offline MP-Ryan

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Influenza has a faster spread and higher mortality rate.  In short, don't panic about coronavirus but DO go get your damn flu shot (it's free in many countries).
"In the beginning, the Universe was created.  This made a lot of people very angry and has widely been regarded as a bad move."  [Douglas Adams]

  
It's quite a bit more serious than that though. This particular bug has an incubation period of 11 days or so and is infectious during it, meaning that people carrying it will infect others during that time. That makes it extraordinarily difficult to control the spread of the infection; if the chinese quarantine measures seem harsh, it's because anything less than that can't work.

I'd say it's not the transmission or fatality that makes it scary, it's this long incubation period that makes it so easy to possibly escape containment which makes it worrying...

In other news, is anybody else playing Plague, Inc.?

 

Offline karajorma

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